Identification of High Risk Commercial Patients for Population Management (Epic XGM 2015)

Just got back from Epic XGScreenshot 2015-07-11 18.43.53M 2015 presenting some of the work I have been doing at Atrius Health in predicting high risk patients.

Some of the session details (slides below):

Summary: Atrius Health expects a large proportion of commercially insured patients to shift into accountable care arrangements in the near future. The presenters will describe their work to develop new risk models for commercial patients, using both financial claims and Epic data, and compare these against other risk models.

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Squire: Handheld Hospital Assistant

Problem

Effective hospital care requires coordination among multiple individuals including therapists, care coordinators, primary teams, consult teams, and nurses. Unfortunately, this coordination is costly to frontline staff often requiring much time and many steps even to identify the appropriate contact. Existing solutions have significant shortcomings without a highly-available best practice.

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The Non-Physician’s Guide to Hacking the Health Care System

Written with my friend and co-founder of Symcat, David.

We are residents and a software developers. Before starting residency, we spent time as software developers in the startup community. We were witness to tremendous enthusiasm directed at solving problems and engaging people in their health. The number of startups trying to disrupt healthcare using data and technology has grown dramatically and every day established healthcare companies appear eager to feed this frenzy through App and Design Competitions.

Continue reading The Non-Physician’s Guide to Hacking the Health Care System on THCB.

Killer Features of the Next Generation EMR

I was absent-mindedly playing with my iPhone today and took special notice of a feature I have rarely used before. If you swipe all the way to the left on the home screen, you will get a search bar to search all of your iPhone. This includes contacts, iMessages, and apps. I’ve never needed to use this before–a testament to the iPhone’s ease of use. Just prior to this, I was working on some patient notes using my hospital’s electronic medical record (EMR). In contrast, each task I performed required a highly-regimented, multi-click process to accomplish.

Criticizing EMR interfaces is a well-loved pastime among clinicians. Here, however, I am going to take an oblique approach and reflect instead on what has made good interfaces (all outside of medicine, it turns out) recognized as such.

Continue reading Killer Features of the Next Generation EMR on the THCB.

Magic Numbers for Startups

Startups are hard. There’s no book. Or are there too many books? If you’re like me, you wind up feeling like you need to learn everything for yourself. That you have to “touch the stove” to know it’s hot.

It can be time consuming to learn Everything There is to Know, so instead we gravitate towards principle, heuristics, or rules of thumb. A set of heuristics are based on specific numbers–Magic Numbers. They can be used as signposts to guide decision-making where uncertainty otherwise prevails.

Several Magic Numbers frequently come up for me: 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 10,000. Why are they so magical? I’ll tell you.

Continue reading Magic Numbers for Startups on the Symcat blog.

Starting a Company as a Medical Student: Part 2

Last week I included my answers to several questions I was asked as part of an interview for The Doctor’s Channel about entrepreneurship as a medical student. You can read that post at Starting a company as a medical student: Part 1.

This week I will finish the 2-part series with answers to the questions:

  1. How did your school admin respond to your request to take a year off for your start-up?
  2. How did you juggle the challenges of running a business with the rigor of being a medical student?
  3. What are some of the skills/lessons you’ve learned while running a business that a typical student would never even think of?
  4. How do you see your decision to launch a business in medical school influencing your future career (residency application, specialty choice, lifestyle, etc.)?

Continue reading Starting a Company as a Medical Student: Part 2 on the Symcat blog.

Starting a Company as a Medical Student: Part 1

We were recently asked by The Doctor’s Channel to share some of our thoughts about being an entrepreneur while in medical school and how that came about. It’s not easy to take the plunge into starting a business with so much medical training already behind you and so much to go.

Here our some of my answers the the questions we are typically asked about starting Symcat while in medical school. Since there are a lot, I’m splitting it up into a two-part series. This week I will be answering

  • Did you have prior experience in business/start-ups before launching your own?
  • Before you started medical school, did you have any feeling that you would be starting a business while still in school?
  • At what point did you start thinking your idea could be scaled from just your school to medical schools across the US?
  • Can you tell me how you made the tough decision of taking time off from school and the different pros/cons you weighed?

Continue reading Starting a Company as a Medical Student: Part 1 on the Symcat blog.